Menzies Lake

  • In Saint John.
  • Named for Thomas Menzies (circa 1733-1831), land grantee there in 1785.

Saint John

  • Although not a Scottish settlement, there were many immigrants from Scotland who remained in Saint John after arriving by boat in the harbour.
  • Also known as the Loyalist City, many of the Loyalists were of Scottish origins.
  • The Saint Andrew’s Society of Saint John, founded in 1798, is the oldest such society in Canada.

Torryburn

  • In Saint John, 6 miles northeast of city centre. Post Office from 1910.
  • Torryburn House is noted on a plan of 1851. Possibly named for Torryburn on the north side of Firth of Forth, in Scotland.
  • Torryburn Cove and Torryburn Point are adjacent features.

Upper Loch Lomond

  • 14 miles northeast of Saint John. Post Office 1863-1941.

Loch Alva

  • Large lake in Westfield Parish, 12 miles west of Saint John.
  • Possibly named by Hon. Hugh Johnston who had a grant on Musquash River in 1808 and whose family was associated with Alva House in Banffshire, Scotland.
  • In the 1800s commonly called Big Lake.

Loch Lomond

  • 11 miles northeast of Saint John.
  • Settled circa 1800. Post Office 1852-1900.
  • See also Loch Lomond, the lake, named by Lauchlan Donaldson circa 1810 for the loch in Scotland. He had a land grant at the west end of the lake.
  • Donaldson was a mayor of Saint John. Formerly called 9-Mile Lake.

Loch Lomond

  • Northeast of Saint John.
  • Named by Lauchlan Donaldson circa 1810 for the loch in Scotland. He had a land grant at the west end of the lake.
  • Donaldson was a mayor of Saint John.
  • Formerly called 9-Mile Lake.

Lorneville

  • In Saint John, 8 miles southwest of city centre.
  • Post Office Pisarinco 1854-1903; Post Office Lorneville 1903-1968.
  • Named for John Douglas Campbell, Marquess of Lorne (1845-1914), Governor General of Canada 1878-1883.

Ben Lomond

  • Prominent hill overlooking Loch Lomond.
  • Named by Lauchlan Donaldson, mayor of Saint John in early 1800s.